Win Wordstock Tickets & Breakfast: A History!

Lizzy Caston

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ENTER BELOW FOR A CHANCE TO WIN A COPY OF BREAKFAST A HISTORY ALONG WITH A PAIR OF PASSES TO THE 2013 WORDSTOCK FESTIVAL BOOK FAIR.

Book, Breakfast, History and Food Cart geeks get ready… what a wonderful combination! That’s why in partnership with Wordstock and local author Heather Arndt Anderson, Food Carts Portland is pleased to announce a special giveaway. We’ll be giving away signed copies of Heather Arndt Anderson’s new book, Breakfast: A History along with pairs of Wordstock Festival Book Fair (aka “the Big Event) passes good for entrance on October 5 and 6, 2013.

HOW TO WIN

  1. Just tell us your favorite breakfast dish from a Portland Food Cart in the comments below. Enter as many times as you wish.
  2. You’ll get a bonus entry point to win if you can add a culinary literary reference to it. Try this for an example, “I love a sausage kolache from Potter’s Kolaches and Coffee while reading Ham on Rye by Charles Bukowski”.
  3. If you like Breakfast: A History’s Facebook Page we’ll even throw in an 2 (Two!) extra entry points for you for an even better chance to win.

In case your memory needs a jingle, here’s a list of Portland Breakfast Food Carts.

Belgian Food Cart circa 1880-1900. Image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dogcart3.jpg

Belgian Food Cart circa 1880-1900. Image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dogcart3.jpg

So what’s the deal with Food Carts, Breakfast and History? Heather Arndt Anderson explains,

Hey, did you know that food carts boast a centuries-long history? No? Well, if your interest has been piqued (or you’re that special kind of nerd that can’t choose between history and gastronomy) you’re in for a real treat.

Portland, as we all know, has perfected the food cart. But we didn’t invent it. Breakfast: A History has an entire chapter devoted to breakfasts eaten away from home, including the original food carts:

Pre-workday fast-food breakfasts are nothing new; they did not even originate in the 20th century. Victorian journalist Henry Mayhew described in London Labour and the London Poor (1851) the thousands of costermongers (street vendors) who walked into London in the pre-dawn hours and stopped at various coffee sellers’ carts or “early breakfast stalls” along the way to buy their breakfast—“a couple of herrings, or a bit of bacon, or whatnot,” perhaps a sausage or an egg sandwiched in a bread roll called a bap. After swallowing the coffee or tea and returning the mug, a stall owner could then continue on to their own stall or wagon, eating as they went.

I don’t know about you, but a sausage and egg in a bread roll still sounds right, even 150+ years after some wastrel starting hustling for a few shillings.

And it wasn’t just the usual western-style fare being hucked by street vendors. In southern Burma, where fresh fish is plentiful, a catfish chowder called mohinga is considered by many to be the national dish. Based on archaeological evidence, mohinga may have been prepared since as early as the 1st century, and has been hawked by street vendors as an “all-day breakfast” for at least a century.

Heather Arndt Anderson will be signing books and meeting readers at Wordstock on Saturday Oct 5 and Sunday Oct 6 so be sure to swing by her booth to say hello. Heather Arndt Anderson will also be hosting a free lecture at the Jack London Bar on Tues, October 1 at 6:30 pm. The topic? Breakfasts From the Silver Screen to the Small Screen. You can bet Food Carts Portland will be there. We’d love to meet you, so come on by and say hello.

About Wordstock: Wordstock is a literary art and education non-profit that celebrates and supports writing in the classroom and in the community. Our mission is to use the power of writing to effect positive change in people’s lives. Wordstock Festival 2013 takes place on October 3rd-6th… The red chair awaits you. Wordstock is the so-much-to-do-­in-­so-­little-­time, had-­to-­be-­there festival. Come experience sensory overload for storytellers, story lovers—and everyone in between. The Wordstock Festival Book Fair takes place October 5 & 6 at the Oregon Convention Center.

About Heather Arndt Anderson: Heather Arndt Anderson is a Portland, Oregon-based plant ecologist and food writer. For the past ten years, she has been conducting botanical field surveys and wetland delineations, and writing technical reports for federal and state regulatory agencies.

Heather is the author of Breakfast: A History (New York: AltaMira Press, 2013) and wrote the Pacific Northwest chapter in the 4-volume Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2011). Her recipes have been published in the cookbook One Big Table: 600 Recipes from the Nation’s Best Home Cooks, Farmers, Fishermen, Pit-Masters, and Chefs, and she is a contributing writer to the magazines The Farmer General and Remedy Quarterly.

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The Wordstock and Breakfast a History Contest Fine Print: The contest runs through Tues Oct 1, 2013 at 5pm when we’ll pick two winners using our foolproof random winner online robot software. The prize includes one Breakfast: A History book and a pair of Wordstock Book Fair passes on Saturday and Sunday October 5 and 6. See above for contest details.

Comments

  1. Living way out in west in Newberg, we like to eat out at Smaaken Waffles. The wife gets the Raspberry Truffle, and I’m a sucker for the smoked Black Forest! Great cart, wish it was open later than four! Both of us love to read about the foodcart culture in Oregon, and I love reading the NW Brewpub News while gobbling down every tasty morsel of my Smaaken treat!

  2. The Brunch Burger from Timber’s Doghouse PDX on SE Belmont.
    FRIED EGG,
    BACON,
    GRILLED ONIONS,
    CHEDDAR,
    AVOCADO,
    AND THEIR GARLIC TRUFFLE AIOLI….
    salivating….
    must eat…NOW!!!

  3. My favorite morning eye-opener:
    Eating a YOLKO ONO at “Fried Egg I’m In Love” while listening to John Lennon on my iPod!

  4. John_Sloop_B says:

    The Fo-Po Christo breakfast sandwich and a coffee at the Egg Carton on Foster along with my Sunday NY Times Book Review gets me going.

  5. I keep it taco truck old school – a chorizo breakfast burrito from Jarocita’s on 5th Ave downtown. Probably will give me a heart attack someday but worth it!!!

  6. Andrea Kienle says:

    Saturday morning hunkering down on a Reginald at Pine State Biscuits at the PSU Farmers Market and a Xocolatl De David Sir Walter Raleigh Bar for an afternoon treat.

  7. Egg Zeppelin from Fried Egg I’m in Love.

    “I have had, in my time, memorable meals of scrambled eggs with fresh truffles, scrambled eggs with caviar and other glamorous things, but to me, there are few things as magnificent as scrambled eggs, pure and simple, perfectly cooked and perfectly seasoned.”
    James Beard, ‘On Food’ (1974)

  8. The Bacon-Gorgonzola wrap at The Big Egg – unmatched!

  9. French toast with seasonal fruits (raspberries are my FAVE!!!) from egg carton at Carts on Foster while enjoying a little Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck!

  10. I recharge by having a FoPo Cristo at the Egg Carton…It’s tiring believing 6 impossible things before breakfast.

  11. veggie smash from bad ass sandwich while enjoying the occasional sun break in PDX

  12. A Black Forest Waffle from Flavourspot!

  13. Currently, I’ve been enjoying the Mary from The Egg Carton and reading Wild by Cheryl Strayed. Gotta love Portland Ketchup in the bloody mary sauce!

  14. Liked Breakfast: A History’s facebook page

  15. Andrea Kienle says:

    Duh, Pine State Biscuits is the Breakfast of Champions!

  16. Tim Rosbach says:

    Pink and Black Waffle Shack BLT Waffle!

  17. Egg Zeppelin again from Fried Egg I’m in Love.

    “‘When you wake up in the morning, Pooh,’ said Piglet at last, ‘what’s the first thing you say to yourself?’ ‘What’s for breakfast?’ said Pooh. ‘What do you say, Piglet?’ ‘I say, I wonder what’s going to happen exciting today?’ said Piglet. Pooh nodded thoughtfully. ‘It’s the same thing,’ he said.”
    A. A. Milne, ‘The House at Pooh Corner’

  18. The breakfast burritos from King Burrito when they were on the corner of 5th and Oak cured many of my hangovers in the mid-2000s.

  19. The best workday morning hangover helper I know: The Black and Bleu from the Brunchbox. Greasy, meaty, cheesy. Cures what ails, ya!

  20. “The Ronald” at the Egg Carton at 52nd and Foster. It’s a yummy english muffin sandwich with bacon, maple syrup, sausage and egg. I tend to eat it while reading my book club books of the moment (last one, “The Periodic Table” by Primo Levi.

  21. Just give me any bagel from Bridgetown Bagels. Especially on a Sunday, when I can savor it while reading the Times Book Review section.

  22. And if they are out of bagels at Bridgetown Bagels, I would more than gladly go for a Yolko Ono from Fried Egg I’m in Love.

  23. The Breakfast Wrap from The Big Egg – it’s a wrap!

    and I liked the facebook page :)

  24. btw, I “liked” the page.

  25. Black & Bleu from Brunchbox!

  26. On my way to work every morning, I would stop by Perierra Creperie on Hawthorne for a Lemon & Sugar or a Nutella & Banana crepe. Sometimes, when the season was right, they would serve fresh cut strawberries with whipped cream. Unreal. I would sit and drink coffee and savor the deliciousness while reading Sharon Olds… or maybe revisit Fitzgerald or Poe. On a crisp, bleak Monday morning, that sort of heavy delight was the only motivation to rejoin the waking world.

  27. Thanks for all the inspired entries everyone! The contest is now closed. We will be rectifying the entries with Breakfast: A History Facebook page likes and picking (and announcing) winners tomorrow.

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